Download Coleridge's Writings: Vol. 4: On Religion And Psychology by John Beer PDF

By John Beer

Of the entire wide-ranging pursuits Coleridge confirmed in his profession, faith was once the private and so much long-lasting; and Beer demonstrates during this booklet that none of his paintings might be absolutely understood with no taking this under consideration. Beer unearths how Coleridge used to be preoccupied via the lifetime of the brain, and the way heavily this topic used to be intertwined with faith in his considering. The insights that emerge during this assortment are of soaking up curiosity, displaying the efforts of a pioneer to reconcile conventional knowledge, either in and out orthodox Christianity, with the questions that have been changing into obvious to a delicate enquirer.

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I heard all his arguments, and told him that it was infinitely consoling to me, to find that the arguments which so great a man adduced against the existence of a God and the evidences of revealed religion were such as had startled me at fifteen, but had become the objects of my smile at twenty. 2 Although Coleridge had reservations about Darwin’s success as a poet, and was baffled by his refusal to consider the arguments in favour of Christianity, he could not but be intrigued by his openness and intelligence as a scientist, as shown in his currently published work Zoonomia, and seems to have cherished the hope of making good what he considered his deficiencies in the religious field by filling the gap himself.

If we . . consider the necessity on the account of Christianity for preserving [the] Israelites themselves, I trust that in the course of these Lectures I shall be able to prove the final End so vast and benevolent as to justify any means that were necessary to it. 7 [Their] communications [from the Deity] consisted sometimes of Admonitions and moral Precepts, but more frequently contained annunciations of future Events. To determine whether these annunciations were accidental guesses, or imparted Rays of the divine Foreknowledge we must again adopt that mode of reasoning by which we proved the existence of an intelligent First Cause, namely the astonishing fitness of one thing to another not in single and solitary instances which might be attributed to the effects of Chance, but in the combination and Procession of all Nature.

He thinks in a new train on all subjects except religion. He bantered me on the subject of religion. I heard all his arguments, and told him that it was infinitely consoling to me, to find that the arguments which so great a man adduced against the existence of a God and the evidences of revealed religion were such as had startled me at fifteen, but had become the objects of my smile at twenty. 2 Although Coleridge had reservations about Darwin’s success as a poet, and was baffled by his refusal to consider the arguments in favour of Christianity, he could not but be intrigued by his openness and intelligence as a scientist, as shown in his currently published work Zoonomia, and seems to have cherished the hope of making good what he considered his deficiencies in the religious field by filling the gap himself.

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